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1. Green tea. A favorite with tea drinkers everywhere, green tea has been praised for its medicinal properties for years. Some recent studies have now confirmed some of these benefits, suggesting that green tea may protect various aspects of our health.

Green tea can increase cognitive functioning. To begin with, this beverage has been found to enhance cognitive functioning, with one study connecting it to better working memory, the type of we use on a day-to-day basis.

2. Jasmine tea. What we refer to as "jasmine tea" is a type of beverage that usually has green tea at its base, to which jasmine flowers are added for an enriched aroma. Jasmine tea is an important component of the diet of one of the longest-living populations in the world. But the benefits of jasmine tea aren't solely due to the antioxidant effects of the tea plant, since jasmine blooms also bring their own medicinal properties to the mix.

3. Rooibos tea. Another type of tea with antioxidant properties is rooibos, or "red bush tea," which is prepared from the Aspalathus linear is plant native to South Africa. Rooibos tea may protect liver health.

Research has suggested that the antioxidant effects of rooibos are similar to, if not quite as strong as, those of green tea. A recent study on the rat model has suggested that the antioxidants in rooibos tea may protect the liver from oxidative stress, helping to render this organ more resilient to induced damage.

The researchers who conducted the study noted that their findings suggest that rooibos tea or rooibos-derived dietary supplements may offer a useful health boost. Moreover, rooibos has also been cited as helpful in lowering blood pressure and relaxing tense muscles, suggesting that the active ingredient in this instance might be one of the flavonoids (pigments) that it contains chrysoeriol. Unlike green or black tea, rooibos does not contain any caffeine, so it won't have the same stimulating effects. This makes it safe to drink well into the evening.

4. Hibiscus tea. Those of you who enjoy the refreshing taste of a more sour brew may also be familiar with herbal infusions of hibiscus, a plant whose flowers can be used not just to make invigorating beverages, but also to give a subtle "punch" to salads, or as an elegant garnish for sophisticated dishes. Hibiscus tea is an antioxidant and may bring cardiovascular benefits.

The most commonly used variety is Hibiscus sabdariffa, also known as the "roselle." For the tea or, more correctly "tisane" (herbal tea)  its calyces are typically used, although other parts of the plant, such as the leaves, seeds, and roots, are safe for consumption. Studies have suggested that extracts from the hibiscus calyx and hibiscus leaves have antioxidant and antitumoral effects.

5. Lemon verbena tea. Another herbal tea whose medicinal properties are getting increasingly recognized is that made out of lemon verbena, scientifically dubbed Aloysia citrodora. Hibiscus tea, made from dried parts of the hibiscus plant, is deep red in color. It has sweet and tart flavors, similar to cranberry, and may be consumed hot or iced. But does drinking it offer people any health benefits?

Many people are familiar with the beautiful flowers of the hibiscus plant (Hibiscus Sabdariffa). It originated in North Africa and Southeast Asia but now grows in many tropical and subtropical climates. People around the world use various parts of the plant as food and medicine. This article explores the potential health benefits and risks of drinking hibiscus tea.

Benefits. Historically, hibiscus tea has been used in African countries to decrease body temperature, treat heart disease, and sooth a sore throat. In Iran, hibiscus tea is used to treat high blood pressure.

Recent studies have looked at the possible role of hibiscus in the treatment of high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

High blood pressure. A 2010 study published in the Journal of Nutrition found that consuming hibiscus tea lowered blood pressure in people at risk of high blood pressure and those with mildly high blood pressure.

Study participants consumed three 8-ounce servings of hibiscus tea or a placebo beverage daily for 6 weeks. Those who drank the hibiscus tea saw a significant reduction in their systolic blood pressure, compared to those who consumed the placebo drink.

meta-analysis of studies published in 2015, found that drinking hibiscus tea significantly lowered both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. More studies are needed to confirm the results.

Cholesterol. Research published in 2011 compared the results of consuming hibiscus versus black tea on cholesterol levels.

Ninety people with high blood pressure consumed either hibiscus or black tea twice a day for 15 days.

 

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